Air Tahiti, the link between the islands

The legend of Air Tahiti

Long ago, in a far distant time, the islands were great fish, that swam the ocean's depths. The demi-gods pursued them in their spectacular double-hulled canoes. Guided by the stars, the winds and ocean currents, they captured the magical fish that, once brought up from the depths, transformed into islands... Read more

© Cédric Doom (Vashee or Vahaeinui)

The legend of the birth of the islands

 
Long ago, in a far distant time, the islands were great fish, that swam the ocean's depths.
The demi-gods Maui, Tafa'i, Ru and his sister Hina pursued them in their spectacular double-hulled canoes.
Guided by the stars, the winds and ocean currents, assisted by their valiant human crews, they captured the magical fish that, once brought up from the depths, transformed into islands.
This incredible catch was made possible thanks to their human intelligence, their divine qualities and their magical fishing tackle: nets, line and hooks made from wood or shimmering mother-of-pearl.
Ru was the trailblazer. He named the cardinal points and then, with his sister Hina, set off to discover the world, pulling Maupiti, Tahaa, Pora Pora (Bora Bora) and Hava'i, now called Raiatea, out of the sea.... But it wasn't enough just to fish-up the islands, they had to be fixed in place, or they would transform back into fish and swim away.    
Later, Maui visited the emergent lands to the East, North and South: Tubu'a'i, Rurutu, Rimatara, Rarotonga and caught many islands.
Tafa'i, a giant, the son of a goddess and man, managed to stabilize Tahiti, still a writhing fish, detached from Hava'i (Raiatea). Then on his canoe Anuanua (Rainbow), with his comrades, he raised from the depths: Mo'orea, Mai'ao, Me'etia, the Tuamotus, Mangareva... pulling them closer to one another.
Air Tahiti continues in the tradition of these legendary heroes with their magical fishhooks, bringing both islands and men closer.

Air Tahiti, Te Natiraa 'o te mau motu, the link between the islands.
 
Text by Simone Taema GRAND, inspired by Teuira Henry's "Ancient Tahiti".